Google To Pay A Fine Of 100,000 Euros For Breach Of France’s Data Protection Policies

Google

Google, currently a unit under Alphabet Inc, claims that it did what it could to uphold the “right to be forgotten ruling thoughtfully and comprehensively in Europe.”

Google has been fined 100,000 euros by France’s data protection agency for its non-conformance to a European privacy ruling regarding filtering of search results.

The Commission Nationale de l’informatique et des Libertes (CNIL) said that Google was required to comprehensively remove from its search results inaccurate data that appeared under name searches, and by failing to do this they have breached the European right to privacy.

The “right to be forgotten” was given a term created by the European Court of Justice in May 2014. It rules that search engines like Google and Microsoft’s Bing could allow people to request that misleading and insufficient results under their names be removed.

The U.S.-based internet giant has been disputing the ruling’s territorial scope against data protection authorities in the E.U.

Google has defended that the delisting of results of its European websites like Germany’s Google.de and France’s Google.fr where it complied with however to go beyond this the ruling would become problematic as the issue of free flow of information would come into play.

However, because it is easy for people to transfer to Google.com from the other European domains, CNIL told Google in May 2015 to extend the ruling to all of its domains.

CNIL said:

“Contrary to Google’s statements, applying delisting to all of the extensions does not curtail freedom of expression insofar as it does not entail any deletion of content from the internet.”

Google, currently a unit under Alphabet Inc, claims that it did what it could to uphold the “right to be forgotten ruling thoughtfully and comprehensively in Europe.”

A Google spokesman, Al Verney said:

 “But as a matter of principle, we disagree with the CNIL’s assertion that it has the authority to control the content that people can access outside France, and we plan to appeal to that ruling,”

The internet company did try to attend to the concerns of the European Union last month and got rid of search results across all of its sites including the Google.com domain.

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